Theeyal

It was a myth widely circulated in the 80s that coconuts are the main sources of cholesterol causing artery blocks, so my mother started reducing the use of coconut meat greatly, used coconut milk sparingly, and stopped using coconut oil. But my grandmothers continued to use coconuts profusely, and they even found a dish insipid if coconut meat is scantily added into it. In those days coconut meat was used in almost every vegetable preparation, coconut milk used for making scrumptious payasam, and coconut oil for frying crunchy snacks like thattai, murukku, banana chips, etc. We relished theeyal mostly in our grandmother’s house as this recipe calls for good lashings of coconut meat fried in coconut oil.

Theeyal (meaning charred curry) got this name as it looks like a charred curry but actually it is not and no charred ingredient is used in here. Traditionally theeyal is stewed in the extract of black tamarinds (old tamarind) that lent a black color to this curry. But now we can use new tamarinds for a brown theeyal.

Ulli theeyal (shallot theeyal) tastes divine when served with hand-pounded brown rice (or other traditional rice varieties or millets), avial and paruppu usili. Besides we can prepare mushroom theeyal (with new tamarind) and serve with dosa, uthappam, appam, or idiyappam.

Now the recipe for traditional ulli theeyal :

Ingredients:

Main Ingredients:
Black tamarinds pressed into a small ball
Shallots (chinna vengayam)250 grams
Cold-pressed coconut oil2 tbsp
Fenugreek seeds (vendhayam)1/2 tsp
Asafoetida block (or a pinch of asafoetida powder)a small piece
Jaggery1/2 tsp
Salt1 tsp
Ingredients for spice powder:
Red chillies4
Coriander seeds1/2 tbsp
Black peppercorns1/2 tsp
Fenugreek seeds1/4 tsp
Coconut pieces (2″)10
Ingredients for tempering:
Coconut oil1 tbsp
Mustard seeds1/2 tsp
Finely chopped coconut piecesas desired
Curry leaves1 sprig

Theeyal spice powder:

  • Heat a pan with 1/2 tsp of coconut oil.
  • Add red chillies, pepper, coriander seeds & fenugreek seeds and roast them in low flame.
  • Remove them from pan when heated up and leave aside.
  • Now pour 2 tbsp of coconut oil into the same pan and add chopped coconut meat.
  • Fry them in medium flame and remove from oil before getting burnt.
  • Now grind the spices & fried coconut pieces into a fine powder as shown below.

Theeyal preparation:

  • Microwave tamarind after adding 100 ml of water for 1 minute.
  • Extract tamarind juice by adding 500 ml of water and keep aside.
  • Heat the same pan used for frying coconut pieces with the left-over oil in medium flame.
  • Add fenugreek seeds & a pinch of asafoetida block in to the oil.
  • Add shallots when the asafoetida is fried and saute until translucent.
  • Pour tamarind extract into the pan and bring it to a boil in high flame.
  • Cover the pan with a lid and simmer until shallots are cooked soft.
  • Then add theeyal spice powder into the pan and mix well.
  • Pour enough water for the required consistency.
  • Add salt & jaggery and bring it to a boil.
  • Meanwhile prepare the tempering and pour it into theeyal.
  • Serve hot theeyal with kaikuthal arisi sadham.

Tips & Tweaks:

  • I like to prepare thick curry for rice and thin curry for dosa, and you can adjust the consistency of theeyal according to your palate.
  • We can also prepare theeyal by replacing shallots with one or more ingredients shown below in the same way we use them in other kuzhambu like pulikuzhambu, karakuzhambu, etc.
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64 Comments Add yours

  1. Lady Oscar says:

    In my native country, Taiwan, we have a lot of coconuts in the south! People drink coconut juice everyday (at the street ^^), and use coconut products. It is a delicious food!

    I am curious if this dish could be found in a restaurant. ^^
    however, I am actually collecting the ingredient and will make it myself!

    1. Megala says:

      Oh! I’m so delighted to hear this, thank you so much.
      By the way I have not seen/ heard any restaurant serving theeyal, perhaps it is possible to find one in Kerala, India. Still people are reluctant to take theeyal fearing the elevated cholesterol level. 🙂
      Thanks again for your constant support.

      1. Lady Oscar says:

        You are very welcome! I enjoy learning your recipes. They are full of rich culture and beautiful life style. Those are truly the most important things for humans!

  2. I love coconut so I just eat it in moderation. This recipe sounds delicious!

    1. Megala says:

      Yes, it was. Thanks Amanda!

  3. Lakshmi Bhat says:

    I make sambhar with shallots. Thank you for this recipe 🙂 It does look delicious.

    1. Megala says:

      I’m glad you liked this recipe. Thank you so much for reading & commenting.

  4. anne leueen says:

    Interesting about coconut and cholesterol. I had never heard that here in Canada. Also coconut oil is sometimes added to horse’s feed . I use flax oil for my horse but others use coconut. It is good for their coats and joints.

    1. Megala says:

      Oh! Nice to hear this. Here defatted coconut is used for making cattle cakes.
      Thank you so much for reading & commenting.

  5. Rupali says:

    Mouth watering.
    We have some coconut trees at home in India and believe me but it taste divine. I use it from poha to dessert ine very recipe.

    1. Megala says:

      Yes, adding coconut makes even a simple recipe deliciously rich.
      Thanks Rupali!

      1. Rupali says:

        Thanks Megala.

  6. This looks delicious! I’ve never had a chance to try out theeyal, but I’m guessing it is a thicker version of Vattalkozhambu. Is that so?

    1. Megala says:

      This is a unique kuzhambu as fried coconut pieces are used in the preparation of spice powder.
      Hope you like to try this once. Thank you.

  7. So intresting and delicious!

    1. Megala says:

      Thank you! 🙂

  8. My Real Dish says:

    Looks so delicious! I love coconut, but I can’t have dairy and I eat a ton of it, but my cholesterol is low. I’ve never heard that!

    1. Megala says:

      Oh! That is nice. 🙂 Thanks much for reading & commenting.

  9. CarolCooks2 says:

    I use coconut oil, drink the juice and eat the soft flesh all the time and use it in my curries as long as moderation is applied I eat what I fancy it is all these processed foods which are bad and full of chemicals which do the harm it is lovely to see you cooking tradition dishes using fresh ingredients., Megla…A lovely recipe which I will definitely try as I also love tamarind 🙂

    1. Megala says:

      Nice to know that you like coconuts & tamarinds, the main ingredients used in south Indian curries. 🙂
      I agree with you that it makes us feel good when we take home-made dishes with no chemical additives.
      Thank you so much for your time.

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